siddharthasmama:

officialmillerhighlife:

everchanginghorizon:

Another species to be added to the ever-growing tick-list:

Africa’s Western Black Rhino has been officially declared EXTINCT. Poaching and lack of conservation have led the subspecies of black rhino to extermination, while the Northern White Rhino is ‘teetering on the brink of extinction’.

    Way to go, humanity.

what’s sad is hardly anyone fucking cares or wants to hear about it let alone talk about it

very disturbing and tragic.

siddharthasmama:

officialmillerhighlife:

everchanginghorizon:

Another species to be added to the ever-growing tick-list:

Africa’s Western Black Rhino has been officially declared EXTINCT. Poaching and lack of conservation have led the subspecies of black rhino to extermination, while the Northern White Rhino is ‘teetering on the brink of extinction’.

    Way to go, humanity.

what’s sad is hardly anyone fucking cares or wants to hear about it let alone talk about it

very disturbing and tragic.

(via thegreenwolf)

yejnoh:

afterlifeanatomy:

Guys! On September 23rd my best buddy’s book Taxidermy Art: A Rogue’s Guide to the Work, the Culture, and How to Do It Yourself is coming out! Rob @abeanpie will also be traveling around on a book release/signing tour! He will be stopping in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Baltimore, and Portland! BROOKLYN FOLKS! Come out to The Bellhouse on October 5th for a taxidermy fair for the book release! There are a bunch of events planned and vendors. I will be doing a demo and I am part of a panel discussion with Rob, Kate Clark, and Nate Hill 🙀😻👍 #taxidermy #roguetaxidermy #robertmarbury #taxidermyart #bookrelease

@morcath

oy

yejnoh:

afterlifeanatomy:

Guys! On September 23rd my best buddy’s book Taxidermy Art: A Rogue’s Guide to the Work, the Culture, and How to Do It Yourself is coming out! Rob @abeanpie will also be traveling around on a book release/signing tour! He will be stopping in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Baltimore, and Portland! BROOKLYN FOLKS! Come out to The Bellhouse on October 5th for a taxidermy fair for the book release! There are a bunch of events planned and vendors. I will be doing a demo and I am part of a panel discussion with Rob, Kate Clark, and Nate Hill 🙀😻👍 #taxidermy #roguetaxidermy #robertmarbury #taxidermyart #bookrelease

@morcath

oy

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

tropesarenotbad:

juliedillon:

bisexualpiratequeen:

"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.”

Women have always fought. We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it.

(Bolding mine)

"We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it."

Anthropology just loves butchering things

This is fantastic.

(via thegreenwolf)

thebrainscoop:

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century. 
3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.
And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 
In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century. 
This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

thebrainscoop:

Remember Martha, the last of her kind, who died on this day a century ago. September 1st marks the extinction of the passenger pigeon, a species of North American bird with incomparable population numbers before they were completely eradicated by humans at the beginning of the 20th century.

3.7 billion to 0 in forty years.

And if you are wishing this wouldn’t happen again, hoping that history doesn’t repeat itself - remember that we are currently enduring the sixth major mass extinction event. While the other five in our earth’s history were naturally caused by everything from major meteoritic impacts, to extreme cooling or warming of the environment, and frequently changing atmosphere - the latest event, Number Six, is being completely attributed to humans. This is the Holocene Extinction. 

In 2012 the IUCN reported that 30% of amphibians are at risk of extinction; as well as 21% of mammals, reptiles, and fish, 12% of birds, 68% of plants. We are looking to lose 30-50% of all species of life on our planet by the middle of the century.

This may feel like a hopeless inevitability, but the future is not set in stone. What we need for this cause is awareness. What we need is an investment of personal interest. We need voices, and students, and teachers. We need scientists, and law makers, and committees and new legislation for the environment. We need communicators. We need enthusiasts and what we really need is to ruin apathy. This is a shared planet, not just between ourselves but with every miraculous piece of life that has erupted on its unlikely surface in the last billion years. We owe it to that great improbability not to mess this up. 

zooophagous:

howtoskinatiger:

cynpeterson:

From now on whenever people tell me coyotes aren’t over populated, I’m going to show them this picture and laugh. This is one night of hunting around my town. One night. 32 coyotes. Keep in mind this is just around town.

Except it’s not as simple as killing large numbers = overpopulated. Just because it seems like a large number to us doesn’t mean there’s more then the area can hold, it can simply be that the area has enough resources to allow for that many animals. 
Coyotes live in family groups, where only the top pair breed. When you kill them in large numbers like this it breaks up those families and causes the non-breeding animals to become breeders, thus far more animals breed and produce more litters then there would have been naturally. 
It’s well-proven that indiscriminate culling of coyotes for population control does not work and can cause their numbers to increase rather then decrease, which is another reason why there may be so many in that area. While I have no issue with culling individual problem or sickly animals or fur trapping, general culling is very ineffective and unnecessary when it comes to coyotes.
Additional links;
Eastern Coyote/Coywolf Research: Canid Management
Biological mechanisms for why killing coyotes/coywolves doesn’t work
Killing not the answer: Coyote Watch

I remember reading that to make an actual dent in their numbers, you’d have to kill like 70% of them and do so every year or something insane like that.

Interesting considering the propensity of killing coyotes for this very reason. I need to read those links later.

zooophagous:

howtoskinatiger:

cynpeterson:

From now on whenever people tell me coyotes aren’t over populated, I’m going to show them this picture and laugh. This is one night of hunting around my town. One night. 32 coyotes. Keep in mind this is just around town.

Except it’s not as simple as killing large numbers = overpopulated. Just because it seems like a large number to us doesn’t mean there’s more then the area can hold, it can simply be that the area has enough resources to allow for that many animals. 

Coyotes live in family groups, where only the top pair breed. When you kill them in large numbers like this it breaks up those families and causes the non-breeding animals to become breeders, thus far more animals breed and produce more litters then there would have been naturally. 

It’s well-proven that indiscriminate culling of coyotes for population control does not work and can cause their numbers to increase rather then decrease, which is another reason why there may be so many in that area. While I have no issue with culling individual problem or sickly animals or fur trapping, general culling is very ineffective and unnecessary when it comes to coyotes.

Additional links;

Eastern Coyote/Coywolf Research: Canid Management

Biological mechanisms for why killing coyotes/coywolves doesn’t work

Killing not the answer: Coyote Watch

I remember reading that to make an actual dent in their numbers, you’d have to kill like 70% of them and do so every year or something insane like that.

Interesting considering the propensity of killing coyotes for this very reason. I need to read those links later.

(via moreanimalia)

Oh hey I’ve never been tagged in a thing before. I’m game! Tagged by skelelegs.

Say five things about yourself;

1) I have come to believe that curry, above all else in life, is the key to true self realization and happiness. In fact I am in the process of making some right now…

2) I took my cat’s name, Orlyn, from an old D&D campaign I played with my friends after high school.

3) I had a reoccurring dream when I was really young that I still remember vividly; I’m in my grandma’s house in Seattle. There’s a huge storm outside, but I can’t hear it in the house. I’m sitting on a swing hanging from the living room ceiling. As I’m swinging a little, a horde of baboons crashes through the window and tackles me off the swing… that was where the dream usually ended.

4)   You can probably name any iconic or “classic” movie, and there’s a good chance I have never seen it, nor even really know what it’s about outside the quotes I hear made reference to in pop culture.

5) I’ve recently garnered an obsession with raccoons, and I’ve been seeing them everywhere in different things and forms. I saw a whole family of them just a few weeks ago, bought a raw hide for practice, went and saw Guardians of the Galaxy, was tagged by someone with a raccoon profile pic, saw a little girl with a tanned raccoon tail on her belt… raccoons everywhere. Coonpocolypse.

Hmm who should I tag for funsies. How about two fellow vultures, ostealjewelry and roadkillandcrows.

personal skelelegs tagged ostealjewelry roadkillandcrows